1. Anonymous asked: Have you considered collecting your nasal discharge? What would you do with it?

    fab3rge-eg0:

    I have been collecting it actually, and I plan to bequeath it to the church my parents took me to until I was six because I think “nasal discharge” counts as a relic? (I expect to be canonized)

  2. -The Onion

    -The Onion

  3. memewhore:

    image

    Whaaat

  4. Secret Service threatened to shoot Mr. Met if he got close to President Clinton, says book →

  5. Haha, half of the job titles available on the Foreign Policy registration page are executive level positions. 

    Haha, half of the job titles available on the Foreign Policy registration page are executive level positions. 

  6. robrilliant:

    Setting a toy helicopter free in midtown manhattan

  7. One of the virtues of never sleeping, Mr. Bond. I have to live my dreams.

    — Gustav Graves in Die Another Day (2002)

  8. Toward More Poetic Job Interviews. →

    I came really close to posting this on LinkedIn.

  9. atelierentomologica:

Rösel von Rosenhof, August Johann ; Kleemann, Christian Friedrich Carl
Der monatlich herausgegebenen Insecten-Belustigung
thanks for the submission http://rougerothko.tumblr.com/

How a caterpillar turns into a butterfly:
First, the caterpillar digests itself, releasing enzymes to dissolve all of its tissues. If you were to cut open a cocoon or chrysalis at just the right time, caterpillar soup would ooze out. But the contents of the pupa are not entirely an amorphous mess. Certain highly organized groups of cells known as imaginal discs survive the digestive process. Before hatching, when a caterpillar is still developing inside its egg, it grows an imaginal disc for each of the adult body parts it will need as a mature butterfly or moth—discs for its eyes, for its wings, its legs and so on. In some species, these imaginal discs remain dormant throughout the caterpillar’s life; in other species, the discs begin to take the shape of adult body parts even before the caterpillar forms a chrysalis or cocoon. Some caterpillars walk around with tiny rudimentary wings tucked inside their bodies, though you would never know it by looking at them.Once a caterpillar has disintegrated all of its tissues except for the imaginal discs, those discs use the protein-rich soup all around them to fuel the rapid cell division required to form the wings, antennae, legs, eyes, genitals and all the other features of an adult butterfly or moth. The imaginal disc for a fruit fly’s wing, for example, might begin with only 50 cells and increase to more than 50,000 cells by the end of metamorphosis. Depending on the species, certain caterpillar muscles and sections of the nervous system are largely preserved in the adult butterfly. One study even suggests that moths remember what they learned in later stages of their lives as caterpillars.

    atelierentomologica:

    Rösel von Rosenhof, August Johann ; Kleemann, Christian Friedrich Carl

    Der monatlich herausgegebenen Insecten-Belustigung

    thanks for the submission http://rougerothko.tumblr.com/


    How a caterpillar turns into a butterfly:


    First, the caterpillar digests itself, releasing enzymes to dissolve all of its tissues. If you were to cut open a cocoon or chrysalis at just the right time, caterpillar soup would ooze out. But the contents of the pupa are not entirely an amorphous mess. Certain highly organized groups of cells known as imaginal discs survive the digestive process. Before hatching, when a caterpillar is still developing inside its egg, it grows an imaginal disc for each of the adult body parts it will need as a mature butterfly or moth—discs for its eyes, for its wings, its legs and so on. In some species, these imaginal discs remain dormant throughout the caterpillar’s life; in other species, the discs begin to take the shape of adult body parts even before the caterpillar forms a chrysalis or cocoon. Some caterpillars walk around with tiny rudimentary wings tucked inside their bodies, though you would never know it by looking at them.

    Once a caterpillar has disintegrated all of its tissues except for the imaginal discs, those discs use the protein-rich soup all around them to fuel the rapid cell division required to form the wings, antennae, legs, eyes, genitals and all the other features of an adult butterfly or moth. The imaginal disc for a fruit fly’s wing, for example, might begin with only 50 cells and increase to more than 50,000 cells by the end of metamorphosis. Depending on the species, certain caterpillar muscles and sections of the nervous system are largely preserved in the adult butterfly. One study even suggests that moths remember what they learned in later stages of their lives as caterpillars.

    (Source: digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de)